Project Management - Agile Leadership

Project Management - Agile Leadership

Quoin can provide a highly-effective project manager for your team. We have over two decades of experience in the successful planning and execution of projects, and have consistently delivered complex software development efforts on time and on budget. We offer a unique ability to apply best practices for agile and lean development, and to adapt our approach to the specific needs of a client.

Project Management - Agile Leadership

Quoin can provide a highly-effective project manager for your team. We have over two decades of experience in the successful planning and execution of projects, and have consistently delivered complex software development efforts on time and on budget. We offer a unique ability to apply best practices for agile and lean development, and to adapt our approach to the specific needs of a client.
Methodology
Agile, Lean, Continuous Integration, Test-driven Development
Function
Project Planning, Project Management, Requirements Analysis, Architecture, Design, Implementation, Testing, Deployment, Support
Clients & Projects
The National Geographic Society, Hachette, Scholastic, GeneralRe, GM Onstar
Engagements
Fixed Effort/Cost, Time & Effort, Consulting

At Quoin, we are enthusiastic users of agile and lean methodologies on all internal and client projects. Experienced Project Management consultantscan provide critical leadership for your team and ensure a successful delivery. We have refined our approach over two decades of software development. We follow a proven process for planning, test-driven development, continuous integration, and comprehensive quality assurance that produces outstanding results for our clients. Our senior staff have the experience to act as an effective scrum master, project manager, or program manager.

The example project plan below includes both a conventional work breakdown into phases and agile development sprints.

 Example Project Plan

Example Project Plan

The fundamental principles of our approach are engagement of domain experts, collaborative teams, incremental delivery, and iterative development. Our approach focuses on flexible project planning and project management that accommodates the inevitable shifts in functional requirements, scope and priority, and best practices that instill quality throughout the development process. Specific development techniques include the following:

Capture user stories — A team specifies a set of requirements as user stories. Each user story defines a feature that is useful to an end-user or client organization stakeholder. The project managers and business analysts at Quoin are continually refining our tools and process to do this and other tasks efficiently and effectively.

Prioritize — A team works with stakeholders to prioritize the user stories that comprise a backlog of requirements. This practice allows a team to implement more important features first.

Plan — Traditional project planning can support an Agile development process. An initial series of planning iterations can define an overall schedule and cost, but the project has to have an effective mechanism for changes in scope and effort.

Iterate — Use a 2-week or 3-week period for planning and execution throughout the project. Each iteration should include iteration planning, daily stand-up meetings, and a retrospective after each iteration.

Manage tasks — A team must effectively manage all development tasks. Tasks are assigned, estimated, and tracked collaboratively in iteration planning and stand-up meetings.

Track progress — Tasks are 'Done' or 'Not Done'. We discourage the use of percentage complete to determine the status of assigned tasks.

Accommodate changes in scope — A team must be able to 'flex' scope to accommodate unexpected effort or complexity in critical features. Working with stakeholders, a team should be able to reduce the complexity of priority stories, defer or eliminate less important stories, or re-prioritize stories for a particular iteration or release.

Test, test, test — Developers write tests first even before coding; we test components, automate tests and builds, and practice continuous integration to ensure code compliance and avoid failures. At the end of each iteration, the team tests system functionality end-to-end.

Release frequently — A team delivers new functionality as part of a stable, testable and visible release candidate each iteration, regardless of the size and length of a project. This discipline allows a team to quickly identify problems and react accordingly.